Welcome to the Digital Toolbox for Iranian Studies and related fields, a continuously growing research repository that currently lists 800 digital resources.

Hermes Media 3 Farsi Typewriter, courtesy of Amir Mesbahi
The Hermes Media 3 Farsi typewriter, photograph from the private archive and by the courtesy of type designer/typographer & researcher Amir Mesbahi.

The toolbox aims at collecting all available digital resources that are relevant to Iranian Studies & related fields of study. It may help you to find:

  • primary sources & academic literature
  • manuscripts & objects in digital archives & collections
  • historic maps, coinage, linguistic corpora
  • academic publications & institutions
  • podcasts, blogs & academic communities
  • and useful apps for your research

Last updated: 5 July 2022

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Image is property of Anita Chowdry

Journeys with Pattern and Colour

Personal blog of visual artist, researcher and educator Anita Chowdry about her work on manuscript studies and artistic practice in illumination studies. She is also the creator of the beautiful manuscript art blog Prince of Black Sheep.

Tehran University Journal Database

سامانه نشر مجلات علمی دانشگاه تهران 

The Tehran University Journal Database let’s you search and download journal articles of currently 209 Iranian academic publications and holds over 59,000 articles.

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تاریک‌خانه‌ی تاریخ

Tārīkḫāne-ye tārīḫ (the darkroom of history) presents one historic photograph every week. Suggestions are always welcome!

Army general Konstantin Gilchevsky was stationed in the Caucasus, Turkey and Iran from 1889 to 1899, and took photographs of everyday life. Here we see the Shah Mosque (مسجد شاه‎‎), also known as the Soltāni Mosque (مسجد سلطانی) in Tehran, Iran. Courtesy of the Zolotarev Collection.
Russian army general Konstantin Gilchevsky was stationed in the Caucasus, Turkey and Iran from 1889 to 1899, and took photographs of everyday life. Here we see the Shah Mosque (مسجد شاه‎‎), also known as the Soltāni Mosque (مسجد سلطانی) in Tehran, Iran. Courtesy of the Zolotarev Collection.

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Disclaimer

vezvez-e kandū is a an independent research project to advance academic and public knowledge in the field of Iranian Studies. This blog is not funded by and not affiliated with any political or religious institution, group, party or movement. Any links shared on this blog or mentions of names are not endorsements.